Know Your Demons: Devos and Devim

Know Your Demons

The most common of the higher demon species, and the most likely to rise to Lord status, the Devos and Devim conform to the shape most recognised to Earth humans when they think of a demon or devil. Looking at them you could almost believe that they are either different species, or that Devim are the children of Devos, but the truth is a little more tragic (in the eyes of humans anyway; not that many have heard the truth).

Both Devos and Devim have iridescent, purple skin, long horns, bat wings, cloven hooves on digitigrade feet, and a pointed tail. Fangs and claws are a given. Then we hit the big difference: Devos are roughly human-sized, typically a little taller, but you could put that down to the leg structure, but the tips of the horns on a Devim rarely make it up to someone’s neck if they stand on hooftip. For those who have never seen a “demon” before, Devos are demons and Devim are imps. Maybe Devim are somehow a related species? Well, no.

The majority of Devos births result in Devim. Physically male, they are infertile, weak, runts of the litter in a litter of runts. Many families toss them out on the streets to fend for themselves and a Devos female who has never managed to birth a Devos is viewed as second-class. She’s likely to be more frustrated with herself, however, and her lack of Devos children is unlikely to endear her Devim to her: often quite the opposite. The lucky Devim are generally those born with or just after a Devos birth since their parents are often more inclined to be generous. And yes, once, a long time ago, one Devim did manage to become a Lord, which just shows what you can do if you’re determined enough.

Both Devos and Devim have an affinity for fire and fire magic. They can throw around fire bolts more or less at will, and frquently know more than a few fire spells. Devos are summoned as general-purpose demons, the default when you don’t know what you need. They will tutor in magic, especially fire magic, and perform other services. Devim are generally used as messengers.

(PS. There was supposed to be a new illustration here with Devos and Devim in, but I’m having some issues with some old models. There might be a new illustration for this at some point, but this poor post has been waiting ages to get published.)

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Demons and Fairies

So, I said I wasn’t happy with Lily’s new model, and while I was creating something new, I did new versions of Twill and Ishifa. And here they are… after the break, because this is Lily, Twill, and Ishifa we’re talking about.

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The New Look Overlord

As you know I’m writing the twelfth book in the Thaumatology series. It now has a name, at least a working one, and I suspect it’ll stay. Book 12 will be called Vengeance. Make of that what you will.

I’ve also been doing some remodelling on my two favorite fantasy characters. I’m not entirely sure I’ve got Lily down right yet. May need a little more work. Ceri, however, looks awesome. She’s come out looking a little like Lena Headey, which is just a perfect look for her. (No, I’m not a Game of Thrones fan; it didn’t occur to me that she was in it until I checked the spelling of her name.)

Since this is a somewhat risque render, I’ll reveal their new look after the break. And please let me know if you think Lily looks great and I’m just being paranoid.

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Know Your Demons

Know Your Demons

 

So, kicking off the first in what should be a series of articles on the demons of the Thaumatology universe with… det.

What is a demon? Well, there are two answers to that. To most humans and practitioners, a demon is an entity from another universe which can be summoned into ours. To the demons themselves, that kind of demon is a “higher demon,” but there are plenty of other kinds and they are collectively known as “det” in the Devotik language most demons speak. The actual difference between the two classes of demon is that det have no talent for working magic. They can work magic, just as any human can do so in a strong enough magical field, but they don’t have any particular aptitude for it, they can’t work more complex or powerful spells, and in many regions they are actually banned from learning it.

There are many species and sub-species of demons, and even more variety of det. In our world anthropologists are just beginning to realise that the line which created us, homo sapiens, has a lot more branches than they originally thought. They were all clipped out leaving us as the dominant species, and a bottleneck in our numbers around 70,000 years ago has left us with little genetic diversity. That never happened in the demons’ world. Demons evolved to fill a vast number of ecological niches, and with a high magic field pervading the world that evolution took some bizarre twists. While humans have a very limited variation between individuals, skin, hair, and eye colour mostly, demons come in all shapes and sizes.

A typical det is between four and six feet in height, and beyond that there is no such thing as a typical det. The illustration shows two variations (with a Devos higher demon behind them for comparison). The blue one there should be recognisable to readers of the books; that’s Hiffy the blue-skinned barmaid with a very nimble tail. The other det in the picture has toughened hide, pointed ears, and a ridged skull. There are red det, green det, det who live exclusively underwater, det who can’t stand light, and they can range in intelligence from barely sentient to near genii.

One thing, however, is common to all det; they can never become higher demons and the higher demons look down upon them for it. Enslaving det is commonplace. In some regions all det are slaves of one kind or another and most areas will allow the enslavement of a det without legal repercussions. There are rich det, but very few in any positions of power. Det are the common, normal people of the demons’ world; be thankful you’re a human, rather than a det.

Faran (and More Reviews)

Lily Carpenter’s father is not your typical dad. He can change shape, make people feel really good just by seeing him, and drain energy from them during sex. Faran is an incubus (when he’s not a succubus).

Faran, aka Helfaran Gef Nartharoll, was summoned to Earth around Christmas 1984 by a bunch of students after a good time. One of them, Sally Carpenter, a witch, got more than she bargained for when she gave birth to a healthy, if underweight, baby girl three months later. By then Faran was back in the demon’s realm and it was years before Faran was summoned again. The birth of his half-demon child gave him a link to Earth, allowing him to stay, and for several years he was the perfect father. Then the link between them started driving a teenage Lily to more and more wild behaviour, and eventually Sally had to have him banished.

The experience left Lily with a profound fear of what might happen if Faran ever returned to Earth. If you want to know what happens when he does, then you should read Legacy, the third book in the Thaumatology series.

In other news, you’ll find short reviews of Thaumatology 101 and Tales from High Towers’ Study over in Smashwords by Ellen J. Miller. Ellen is a friend, but she likes the books anyway. She’s also my chief sanity checker. If she thinks I’ve gone off the deep end with any of these books, I know I need a rewrite.

Check here: http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/Thaumatologist

Tales from High Towers’ Study

The anthology is up. This features slightly updated versions of the stories previously published on Wattpad, plus a new one, Nightshade, which features John Radcliffe and Kate Middleshaw.

You can download it here: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/124026

I’ll likely get it up on Amazon tomorrow if you prefer your Kindle editions delivered the easy way.

The cover for this one was suggested by Tera over at succubus.net. I managed to get the ice-cream in there too.

It'll all end in giggles.